Weekly Report 24 April 2020

Coronavirus
More and more protests are spreading globally against the government-mandated lockdowns. Demonstrators have marched against alleged government overreactions, violations of civil liberties, damages to local economies and consequent unemployment, and police violence used to enforce lockdowns. In light of anti-quarantine demonstrations in the United States, Facebook is banning events and propaganda that defy the government’s social distancing policies. Interestingly enough, more “physically distant” protests are taking place on a global scale after last week’s protest in Warsaw; thousands of Israeli citizens demonstrated their dissent against the Netanyahu-Gantz coalition in Tel Aviv.

Hong Kong
Hong Kong police arrested 15 of the city’s highest-profile political, legal, and media opposition figures related to the pro-democracy protests in 2019. Among the detained was Martin Lee (81) the founder of the Democratic party. The 15 were accused of joining three unapproved protests on August 18th, October 1st, and October 20th last year.

The arrests came just after China’s top representative office declared that it was “not bound by Hong Kong’s constitutional restrictions that bar Chinese government from interfering in local affairs.”  This is the biggest crackdown on pro-democracy protests since June last year.

China
Li Zehua, a Chinese journalist who disappeared almost 2 months ago after posting videos from Wuhan during the pandemic, has reappeared. He claims that he was imprisoned by the police and forcibly quarantined. Li Zehua was one of three reporters who had been reporting from the front lines in Wuhan during some of the worst weeks of the pandemic. He was last seen on the 26th of February after posting a video in which he was chased by a white SUV in an hour-long live stream that ended when several people from public security entered his apartment.

Syria
A landmark trial in Germany against two former Syrian intelligence officials (Anwar R. and Eyad A.) accused of tutoring prisoners in Syrian prisons began on Thursday. This is the first trial for crimes against humanity by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

German prosecutors accused Anwar R., who was a head of the investigations section at the General Intelligence Directorate’s al-Khatib detention facility in Damascus, of torture of “at least 4,000 people” during interrogations at the facility. He is also accused of the murder of 58 people, as well as rape and aggravated sexual assault. Eyad A. was a lower-ranking official at the same intelligence agency, and he is accused of involvement in crimes against humanity. Prosecutors allege that he detained protesters in 2011 and delivered them to the al-Khatib detention facility, where they were later tortured.

Chile
Despite the coronavirus pandemic, anti-government protests were held in Santiago. Health officials have banned gatherings of more than 50 people; it is not clear how many people attended the protest. Photos show that protesters are keeping their distance from each other. Chilean police broke up the protests and arrested 14 people claiming they were violating social distancing laws.

Iran
Iran has begun its soft opening after the “government lifted a ban on inter-city travel and ended a closure of businesses.” Malls and bazaars opened on Monday even though health officials have warned the public of a possible resurgence of the coronavirus. The government, trying to find a balance between “protecting public health and shielding the economy,” has prolonged the return dates of students to schools and universities. It has also “banned cultural, religious and sports gatherings.”

Palestine
Rates of domestic violence have spiked all around the world since government-mandated lockdowns began, especially in Palestine. Thus far, “at least five women have been killed at the hands of their abusers” since the lockdown began. Activists have been “banging pots and pans and waving homemade banners… [expressing] their solidarity with women enduring various forms of domestic violence.”

United States
In a 158-page report released Tuesday, a Republican-led Senate review stated that “American intelligence officials’ determination that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election to assist Donald J. Trump’s candidacy was fundamentally sound and untainted by politics.” Chairman of the Intelligence Committee, Republican Senator Richard M. Burr, has stated that “Russia had continued efforts to interfere in American politics… [and that] the warnings of three years ago still must be heeded.”

Nicaragua
Although the coronavirus has been confirmed in Nicaragua, all life activities are taking place quite normally – such as soccer matches, food festivals, and beauty pageants. The government of Nicaragua said that there are only three active cases and one death attributed to COVID-19, but John Hopkins University said that there are nine cases and two deaths.

Dora Maria Tellez, President Ortega’s opponent, said that there is no transparency of information and that “the Health Ministry’s webpage isn’t updated, it doesn’t have the number of tests run, how many are positive, how many negative.” Recall that Ortega dubbed the pandemic as a sign from God.

Lebanon
Civil unrest is continuing to rise as the coronavirus brings “hardships unseen in Lebanon even during the bitter days of its 15-year civil conflict that ended in 1990.” The economy has plummeted, forcing some citizens to “seek aid’ – a task they had never resorted to in the past. However, only “a fraction of those in need qualify for government assistance.” Millions of people are starving; the poverty rate has skyrocketed.

Russia
Russia and the United States have both confirmed that “a Russian fighter aircraft approached a US Navy aircraft over the Mediterranean Sea Sunday.” The U.S. Navy reported that the aircraft was flying “in an unsafe and unprofessional manner.” Russian military officials stated that the “aircraft took off from Syria’s Hmeimim airbase to identify a target approaching Russian military facilities in Syria.

Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe’s government has cut back the mandatory quarantine period for possible coronavirus cases by one-half because they lack the resources needed to take care of patients in isolation for the two-week period recommended by the World Health Organization. Health Minister Obediah Moyo said that if people are “found to be positive they will be sent to an isolation center. And if they are found to be negative they will be released. It decongests the facilities.”

Sudan
Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has warned that the coronavirus will pose a serious threat to citizens as the number of covid patients continues to grow exponentially. The Ministry of Health has issued a warning that “catastrophic conditions could lead to the collapse of the entire health sector.”

Libya
The Lybian Government of National Accord (GNA) Minister Fathi Bashagha announced on Wednesday that members of Russian private military contractor Wagner, fighting on the side of general Khalifa Haftar, used nerve gas in Tripoli. Wagner is an extremely controversial military contractor; it is owned by businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin, who is close to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Myanmar
As fears of prisoners’ vulnerability to the coronavirus disseminate through the country, the government is releasing Rohingya Muslims and sending them to Rakhine state. They will “live under tight movement restrictions and in conditions Amnesty International has condemned as ‘apartheid’.” This is the country’s largest prisoner release in several years.

Iraq
At least one person died after being shot in Baghdad a few hours after the partial easing of coronavirus containment measures. Even before the imposition of a national curfew, Iraq saw a large number of protests calling for a change in the country’s political system and the implementation of electoral and economic reforms.

Venezuela
Allies of bitter rivals President Nicolas Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaido have engaged in secret talks over the handling of the coronavirus. The two sides have come together for the first time to discuss hyperinflation, growing fuel shortages, and the future of the country.

North Korea
North Korea has finally confirmed that it does, in fact, have coronavirus patients despite Kim Jong-Un’s many statements saying the virus was not present in the country. Officials told citizens those who have been affected by the virus “were confined to only three areas of the country: Pyongyang, as well as the South Hwanghae province and North Hamgyong province.”

Weekly Report 17 April 2020

Coronavirus
An American hospital in Chicago has been issuing Gilead Sciences’ antiviral medicine remdesivir to coronavirus patients, and the results are promising. Patients who were issued the drug saw “rapid recoveries in fever and respiratory symptoms” and “nearly all patients were discharged in less than a week.” Doctors and researchers are going to run more clinical trials in hopes that the drug will become the most efficient way to treat covid patients.

Iran
Coronavirus: Iran’s Parliament has stated that the reported death toll is “actually at least double that, as officials have not been counting community deaths.” The virus has reportedly claimed the lives of more than 4,700 Iranians. The number of cases is supposedly “eight to 10 times” higher than what has been reported, meaning that there are approximately 700,000 cases in Iran as opposed to 76,389.

Disinformation: The pro-Iranian group dubbed the International Union of Virtual Media (IUVM) has been spreading conspiracy theories on social media regarding the origins of the coronavirus. IUVM has openly blamed the United States for not only creating the virus but also for spreading it to “enemies” like Iran and China. The group has only reached about 5,000 people on social media thus far.

China
New reports are claiming that “China’s leaders allegedly failed to notify the public about the looming crisis during a critical six-day period.” Leaked documents have confirmed that government officials downplayed the severity of covid-19 and ignored warnings from a “top Chinese health adviser” who stated that this novel virus was “the most severe challenge since SARS in 2003.”

Chile
Chile’s Health Minister Jaime Mañalich said that patients who died of coronavirus are being counted among the recovery population because they are “no longer contagious.” It is unknown when Chile began including the dead among the number of people who have recovered. But the government claims that calculation has reportedly been adopted upon confirmation by international health experts.

Palestine
Riots: A radical settler youth group set fire to a Palestinian camper and cars overnight on Monday. The group of settlers was placed in a secluded tent last week after they came in contact with a confirmed coronavirus patient.

Arrests: Israeli police raided a coronavirus testing clinic in the East Jerusalem Palestinian neighborhood of Silwan on Tuesday Night. They arrested its organizers because the clinic was collaborating with the Palestinian Authority to treat patients.

Nicaragua
President Daniel Ortega has made a public appearance for the first time in over a month. In his speech, he “refused to adopt the social-distancing and lockdown measures in other countries,” and said that the novel virus is “a sign from God.”

Lebanon
Earlier this week, Israeli troops crossed the border that the United Nations had marked between Lebanon and Israel. The soldiers had brought a military bulldozer, a tent, and engineering equipment into the country. Lebanese forces “faced off” with the Israeli troops, forcing them to leave the area.

Russia
In an attempt to contain the coronavirus, Moscow, the epicenter of the virus in Russia, has “introduced a digital tracking system to enforce a coronavirus lockdown.” While critics have expressed their concerns about the threat of citizens’ privacy, Moscow will carry out its plan to have all residents over 14 download a QR code. The tracking “will initially only apply to people using public transport,” but “the restrictions will gradually scale up to passes for short trips around neighborhoods.”

Zimbabwe
After a fake news story surfaced about the possibility of an extended national lockdown, President Emmerson Mnangagwa has threatened the reporter with 20 years in prison. Thus far, only a few hundred people have been tested as of Monday night, and “more than 5,000 people had been arrested” for breaking quarantine.

Hong Kong
Activist Hendrick Lui has lost a “legal challenge” over a “police watchdog probe into [the] handling of protests” after the High Court dismissed a judicial review. The court has decided that the Independent Police Complaints Council’s (IPCC) initiation of a probe into the “police handling of large-scale protests” was completely legal, as the IPCC has been granted the power to “launch its own investigations.”

Sudan
Eight Sudan Armed Forces soldiers forcibly removed El Safi El Degein, a 42-year-old farmer, from his home, and the Sudanese Human Rights and Development Organization (HUDO) has “expressed it concerns about El Degein’s detention,” as there were no reasons provided for his removal. It is believed that his detention is tied to his “political activities in the past’.’ El Degein has been denied visits from families, friends, and lawyers.

United States
On April 15th, protests against social distancing and shutdown measures occurred in several states. The biggest demonstration, called “operation gridlock”, took place in Lansing, the capital of Michigan. Thousands of people reached the state capitol by car to honk their horns and fly American flags as a sign of dissent.

Libya
Libya’s Government of National Accord carried out an airstrike on Tuesday, clearing “3,000 square kilometers of land occupied by Haftar’s militants following operations in western Libya”. The airstrikes were targeting militants who had openly shown their loyalty to renegade commander Khalifa Haftar.

Bolivia
Interim president Jeanine Añez has extended the government-mandated quarantine to April 30th. She also stated that the government would be offering “another pittance to Bolivia’s impoverished workers and peasants.” Families who fit under either of those categories will be given a “universal bonus” of less than $73.

Myanmar
Scientists have found six new types of coronavirus in bats in Myanmar. They have hypothesized that there are “thousands of coronaviruses – many of which have yet to be discovered” in bats.

Iraq
After Reuters published a piece on Iraq’s response to COVID-19, “Iraq’s media regulator said it was revoking Reuters’ license for three months and fining it 25 million dinars.” The news agency has stated that it does not regret publishing the article and that all of their published works were “based on multiple, well-placed medical and political sources.”

Syria
On Wednesday, what is believed to be an Israeli aircraft “struck a vehicle” traveling “just inside Syria.” The airstrike was supposedly targeting a Hezbollah operative that had been accused of smuggling weapons. Israel has yet to release a statement regarding the attack.

North Korea
North Korea launched missiles on Tuesday amidst the global pandemic, and “analysts fear… Kim Jong-un may be lashing in the face of a mounting humanitarian crisis.”  North Korea has yet to report any coronavirus cases, but health experts are skeptical of these claims.

Weekly Report 10 April 2020

Coronavirus

As the novel virus continues to viciously rampage through the international community, governments are using lockdowns and curfews as a means to violently disband activist groups. Venezuelan volunteer medic Antonio Cueto told journalists that “the virus is just what the government needed” for it to enforce draconian policies that will affect demonstrators. Chile, Hong Kong, and Lebanon, global hot spots of civil unrest, “are zapping the momentum from pro-democracy movements.”

In lieu of the governmental crackdowns, activists are “adopting creative tactics” to disseminate their messages throughout their communities. Activist organizations are donating thousands of masks and other protective medical gear to people in need. These groups are expanding their networks while solidifying the roles they play within their respective communities, gaining both respect and legitimacy.

Lebanon

Assassination: Hezbollah commander Ali Mohammed Younis, a “close associate” of Qasem Soleimani, was assassinated over the weekend. No group has claimed to be responsible for Younis’s death, the “Massad ‘and its mercenaries” [are] suspects in the assassination.”

Prison Protests: After prisoners tried to escape over fears of contracting COVID-19, a “fiery” riot broke out on Tuesday. Security forces fired rubber bullets into the crowd, injuring at least four inmates.

Iran

Prison Protests: Detainees in Iranian prisons have been protesting against their facilities over “fears of contracting the coronavirus, sparking deadly responses from prison officers and security forces.” Approximately 36 inmates have been killed so far. The prisoners’ demands are simple – they are requesting that they be protected from the novel virus while serving their sentences.

Nicaragua

The public has not seen President Daniel Ortega in 25 days, leaving citizens to wonder about his health. Nicaragua has yet to mandate any school or border closures, and the government has only confirmed four COVID patients and one death. Ortega has missed rallies, government events, and the funeral of a close ally. The Civic Alliance opposition group believes that his “extended absence [is] a deliberate move to manipulate the public.”

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwean doctors have sued the government because of its failure to provide hospitals with protective gear and testing kits. The Zimbabwe Association for Doctors for Human Rights (ZADHR) has warned that without protective equipment medical professionals could die.

Hong Kong

On Thursday, courts stated that chief executive Carrie Lam can use colonial-era laws to make emergency decrees regarding public safety. Lam has categorized the ongoing protests as “public danger[s.]” She has also banned the wearing of masks at both lawful and unlawful assemblies.

China

Wuhan has reopened after completing its two-month lockdown. 93% of businesses have “resumed operations,” but officials have recommended that people continue to engage in minimal social contact for the time being.

Sudan

Sudanese doctors have gone on strike after enduring physical attacks from policemen. Doctors are trying to warn citizens of the dangers of COVID-19, but their attempts have been futile. The police have denied all accusations.

Venezuela

Oil has become a scarce product in Venezuela; people are lining up in their cars for hours to fill their tanks. Prices have skyrocketed – one gallon is $5.67. The oil shortage is the catalyst that will raise “the specter of a repeat of deadly unrest from earlier years.”

Colombia’s new policy restricting Venezuelan refugees from engaging in economic activity has resulted in an influx of migrants returning to Venezuela. All returning Venezuelans are being quarantined along the border; their return has posed a significant threat to the already overwhelmed medical system.

Libya

Shelling: A hospital fell victim to a shelling on Monday that injured six health care
Professionals. The United Nations has condemned this attack, saying that is was a “clear violation of international law.”

Scarce Resources: Tripoli’s water and power supplies were cut on Tuesday and Wednesday, leaving many Libyans without essential resources that were already scarce due to the war and the coronavirus.

Bolivia

Lockdown: Interim president Jeanine Anez signed a decree to extend the lockdown in Bolivia. Article 13-2 of the decree states that “individuals who incite non-compliance with this decree or misinform or cause uncertainty to the population will be subject to criminal charges for crimes against public health.” Those who fail to abide by the new policies can face one to 10 years in prison.

Human Rights: Critics of the Bolivian government have stated that officials are “taking advantage of the pandemic to give itself the power to punish anyone who publishes information the government deems ‘incorrect,’ in violation of free speech protections.”

Myanmar

Since the COVID-19 breakout, Myanmar’s government has gone to great lengths to censor media and news outlets. Activists have claimed that the “government is ‘taking advantage’ of the pandemic to ‘censor legitimate information and curtail freedom of expression.’” Over 260 organizations have released statements condemning the government’s actions.

Iraq

Shellings: An “American oil company” connected to Halliburton was targeted in a missile attack on Monday. While the report’s validity is being questioned, the attack is yet another example of “Iran’s attempt to play up attacks on the US in Iraq as a part of a media campaign trying to warn the US to leave.”

Government: Iraqi President Barham Salih has appointed a new prime minister-designate – the third one this year. The new designate, head of intelligence Mustafa al-Kadhimi, is believed to have recently strengthened ties with Iran and has a history of “close links” with the United States. He must propose his cabinet to parliament in 30 days to undergo a vote of confidence.

Syria

The international chemical weapons watchdog confirmed that the Syrian air force used sarin and chlorine in three chemical attacks in 2017. United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo stated that the findings represent “‘the latest in a large and growing body of evidence that the Assad regime uses chemical weapons attacks in Syria as part of a deliberate campaign of violence against the Syrian people.”

North Korea

Despite the fact that there have been more than one million confirmed cases of COVID-19 worldwide, North Korea has yet to report any cases. The government has stated that it has placed hundreds of people into quarantine. More than 700 people have been tested, but officials have stated that all of the results were negative.

Palestine

Jerusalem’s Palestinian governor, Adnan Gaith, was arrested by Israeli authorities for running Palestinian activities in Jerusalem – a feat that Israel has deemed illegal.

Russia

A Russian man was arrested for fatally shooting five people “after asking them not to be so loud” during the government-mandated lockdown.

Weekly Report 3 April 2020

Coronavirus

The Numbers: The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 has surpassed one million. The United States currently has the most cases in the world with a total of 265,506.

A Global Effort: Companies around the world are coming together to produce ventilators, hand sanitizer, and masks for health care professionals. Doctors are also traveling to different countries to help battle COVID-19; more than 29,000 Cuban doctors are currently working in 59 countries.

Cancellations: Countless tournaments and major sporting events have been canceled and postponed as an effect of the coronavirus. Wimbledon and the Olympics have been postponed for the first time since World War II.

Zimbabwe

Coronavirus: The government has implemented a three-week-long nationwide lockdown, causing people to flock to grocery stores. Zimbabwe is still experiencing the effects of a drought that occurred two years ago; there is a shortage of “maize meal, or mealie meal, a Zimbabwean staple.” Citizens are more worried about dying of hunger than the coronavirus. The ongoing economic crisis also poses a problem for the government; “Zimbabwe’s annual inflation soared to more than 500 percent in February.”

Economic Crisis: According to Zimbabwe’s Energy Minister, the nation “has paid the $33 million debt it owed to South Africa’s Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd.” Zimbabwe is now creating its plan to pay the debt it owes Mozambique.

Lebanon

Protests: Despite the lockdown, Lebanese citizens of Tripoli broke the curfew to protest against the lack of governmental compensation for businesses that have closed due to the coronavirus. Protesters are also demanding financial aid to cover rent and utility payments.

Human Rights: Sans-papiers in Lebanon have been denied the possibility to be tested for Coronavirus due to the high costs of the procedure. Some hospitals have confirmed that their policy is to turn away undocumented people, claiming that they are not in need of health care.

Iran

Riots: Several riots have occurred among prisoners in Iran over fears of contamination in prisons. Iran’s prison authority recently released over 100,000 prisoners to slow the spread of COVID-19 amongst inmates. Furlough excludes so-called “security cases,” including violent offenders, dual-nationals, and people with ties to western governments.

Sanctions: Iranian officials are pressing the United States to lift sanctions in order to properly treat coronavirus patients. Foreign Minister Javad Zarif referred to the sanctions as “economic terrorism,” as they are preventing Iran from purchasing necessary medical equipment. The country has more than 47,000 confirmed cases and more than 3,000 deaths.

Hong Kong

The government has banned public gatherings of more than four people. Citizens are afraid that this will “be used to crack down on political dissent – and it appears to be happening already.” Protesters gathered on Tuesday to mark seven months since police randomly beat passengers on a train. The police quickly detained the protesters “to avoid the spread of the disease in society.”

China

Wuhan residents are suspecting that the Chinese government hasn’t been completely truthful about the number of virus-related deaths the country has seen in the past few months. As the two-month lockdown is coming to an end, citizens have noticed that crematoriums have been working nonstop. Radio Free Asia has estimated that 42,000 urns will be given out in a 12 day period, and “there have also been claims of city officials paying off families in exchange for their silence.”

Venezuela

United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo presented the “Democratic Transition Framework for Venezuela” on Tuesday. According to Pompeo, the plan “ends the suffering and opens a path to a brighter future for Venezuela.” It would replace both Maduro and Guaidó with a five-person council until the next presidential and parliamentary elections, which are set to take place in six months to one year. The framework would also require the US to lift sanctions so that Venezuela could strengthen its economy.

Libya

COVID-19: Tripoli has announced the liberation of 450 prisoners as a measure to limit the spread of the virus in prisons. The preventative measure was announced after Hanan Salah, Human Rights Watch’s senior researcher, reported that the Libyan Health Care system is not strong enough to cope with a large number of patients.

Missile Attack: On Wednesday, a Turkish warship fired missiles in Al-Ajaylat, “which is under the control of Field Marchal Khalifa Haftar.” Libyan news sources have said that the missiles could have initially been targeted at the Al-Watiya Air Force Base. There were no casualties.

Bolivia

Bolivians are getting increasingly frustrated with the government’s response to the coronavirus after completing two weeks in quarantine. Most Bolivians have lost their main source of income; they have yet to receive government assistance. Residents of Cochabamba even took to the streets to express their dissatisfaction.

Myanmar

As the coronavirus continues to wreak havoc around the world, Myanmar has “temporarily” suspended entry visas. It has also stopped all international flights from landing in the country. The government confirmed its first two cases of the virus just last week and the first death on Tuesday. More preventative measures are expected to be implemented in the near future.

Palestine

The UN “has showered praise on Israel for is ‘excellent’ cooperation with the Palestinian Authority in fighting the coronavirus.”  The two nations have implemented a mechanism that allows them to communicate “moment by moment” on all virus-related issues. However, the Palestinian delegation still slammed Israeli leaders, saying “occupation knows nothing of humanity.”

Iraq

Prime Minister Abdil Abdul-Mahdi held a cabinet meeting on Sunday where he “warned that carrying out attacks and acts of war without the authorization of the Iraqi government is a clear violation of Iraq’s sovereignty.” Given that the coronavirus is a major threat to countries around the world, Abdul-Mahdi is adamant that violence within the country must decrease in order to more directly focus on treating patients.

Nicaragua

While much of Latin America is closing its borders to prevent the spread of COVID-19, Nicaraguan officials are still considering the pandemic “overrated.” They are encouraging citizens to go about their everyday lives, and the government has yet to place a limit on large gatherings. Residents are begging the government to do more. In response to their pleas, President Ortega replaced his health minister on Wednesday.

North Korea

According to South Korean officials, North Korea launched what was believed to be two short-range ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan on Sunday. South Korea’s Joint Chief of Staff has deemed the test to be “totally inappropriate behavior,” given that the world is grappling with a pandemic.

Russia

After US President Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin spoke this week, a Russian military plane carrying medical supplies landed in the US on Wednesday. The supplies included “60 tons of ventilators, masks, respirators, and other items.” However, an argument over the nature of the shipment quickly revived tensions between Trump and Putin. Trump called it “a very nice offer,” when in reality they were purchased from Russia at below-market prices.

United States

US soldiers are pulling out of the third base this month in Iraq, leaving at least $1.1 million of equipment to Iraqi forces. More withdrawals are expected to take place in the near future. The current mission of the US army is to occupy only two bases in Iraq.

Syria

Ceasefire: Turkish armed forces hacked into a Syrian army radio broadcast to issue “a warning not to violate the de-escalation zone.” Turkey has continued to mobilize forces in Idlib “in case the agreement breaks down.”

Coronavirus: Syria’s Ministry of Health has reported its first virus-related death.

Other News:

Hungary: Citing the urgency of the coronavirus pandemic, Hungary’s parliament has approved a bill to allow Prime Minister Viktor Orban to rule by decree with no end date. After this approval, Ursula von der Leyen warned that coronavirus emergency measures taken by countries in the EU must be “limited,” as the bill is explicitly circumventing democratic institutions in the EU.

Mexico: Maria Elena Ferral, a correspondent for the Diario del Xalapa daily newspaper, was shot and killed on Monday. Mexico is one of the most dangerous places in the world for a reporter to work; more than 100 journalists have been murdered since 2000.